Ashleigh Broady

Exterior EntryCancer Centre ReceptionWine BarCommunal KitchenHallway garden
About me 

For as long as I can remember I have had a passion for design and architecture. This course has taught me to appreciate and carefully consider design; from the spatial macro scale to the intricate, human scale detailing. Growing up amongst the unique NSW bushland has also nurtured my love of nature and the outdoors, which often influences my design style. Throughout my graduation project I aim to create beautiful spaces and clever, innovative details that translates modern reasoning and research into architectural structures.


CURE

brief

My proposal for the White Bay Power Station (WBPS) is ‘CURE’- a holistic oncological treatment centre that includes cultural and research facilities. Whilst these spaces typically would not coexist, through vigorous planning and design, the WBPS can shift the hospital typology into a significant civic building, which becomes integral to the recovery process of patients, their support network, and the wider public.

During the course of interviews, a common issue raised by cancer patients was the lack of community engagement and entertainment availability during the oncology treatment process. Patients described this absence of meaningful and engaging outlets as contributing to a sense of isolation and dejectedness, which had overall poor outcomes for their emotional and mental wellbeing. This impact manifested itself negatively in the treatment process, for example, with patients missing appointments - and thus necessary treatment - due to their sense of futility and removal from the outside world. Supporting these empirical observations is the data from various studies, which has demonstrated a direct correlation between positive mental health and improved physical health in response to treatment.  

By combining a cultural centre with the cancer centre, CURE facilitates patients gaining access to engagement and entertainment programs whilst undergoing treatment, in addition to the provision of alternative therapies. Ideally, this combination will aid successful cancer treatment, by addressing the mental and emotional needs of patients of social interaction and activity, improving their overall wellbeing in conjunction with their oncological procedures. Adjoining the cancer centre at CURE are private housing facilities that will allow cancer patients and family members to remain on site during periods of intensive treatment. In addition to this, leading international medical professionals will be invited to stay on site while delivering seminars and contributing to the cancer research and treatment programs.

CURE was designed in a comprehensive manner where research, clinical treatment and entertainment co-exist harmoniously. The environment nurtures the innovation of doctors and scientists, allowing a much more rapid transition between clinical research and treatment process.

 

project

Developing the CURE: Reinvigorating the Treatment Process and Hospital Structure through Design

The earliest hospitals were remote communities whereby the ill were in state of quarantine from the wider population. 21st century hospitals have developed significantly since their refuge-oriented predecessors, and further as both disease and research advance, hospitals will need to enjoy an increasingly integral role within civil communities. Consequently, hospitals are no longer mere havens of the sick but rather all-encompassing facilities dedicated not only towards the physical medical treatment of patients, but also the provision of emotional, scientific and cultural support for patients and the broader community. CURE, through combining a cancer centre and cultural centre, facilitates this shift of purpose, whilst also improving mental well-being during treatment, a vital step in improving the holistic treatment of cancer.

I have designed CURE in alignment with research from the first phase of the project.  Evidence suggests aspects of the designed environment exert significant effects on clinical outcomes of patients (Rubin et al, 1998). Whilst most healthcare facilities neglect non-functional design aspects, the Ulrich report outlines the necessity for well-designed environments in reducing stress, anxiety, blood pressure, lessening pain and improving medical outcomes. I have focused on designing spaces within CURE that are bright, open and inviting, ensuring that natural materials and plants are visible throughout the entire centre. The three voids where machinery once sat have now been converted to light wells, that act as a spine to the entire building.  The light wells are vital as they provide natural light, which is proven to increase people’s productivity, mood and medical outcomes. On the other hand, the garden element provides a calming space, which fosters relaxation thereby reducing stress levels and pain, which improves the immune system, allowing patients’ bodies to heal more effectively. The 3D garden placed within these spaces, creates meeting space, passageways, lookout points and office spaces, allowing connectedness within the building between levels of research, treatment and housing. The design program has been formed with research on the lower levels, treatment on the middle level and housing on the top levels. This allows each space to be private enough for functional needs but also accessible as an interconnecting complex.

The innovation of CURE

CURE aims to deliver the much-needed hub for creative events that will be both permanent and adaptable with neighbouring hospitality facilities.  Providing both large-scale dramatic and intimate theatres and classroom-like spaces allows a variety of activities to take place within the cultural facilities and provides both tourism appeal and much needed services for the community. The integration of the cancer and cultural centres will also help promote cancer awareness, treatment typologies and prevention measures through complimentary onsite cancer screening tests. The cultural centre will also benefit patients who will be given unlimited access to performances and alternative therapies such as dance and humour therapy, encouraging patients to maintain treatment and boost their mental wellbeing, which in turn improves medical outcomes.

The introduction of rotational leading doctors through the onsite doctors-in-residence program allows for the ideas and thinking, which could potentially generate new research and innovation. Having a combined treatment and research centre allows physicians and researchers to work alongside each other, helping the research proceed swiftly into treatment.

CURE: A means of inspiration and survival

Cancer is a horrific illness that touches all members of the community in some way. By harnessing the multilevel and large space of WBPS, in the form of a coexisting cultural and treatment space, CURE aims to be a place, not only of treatment, but of survival and inspiration, for patients, medical professionals and the wider community.

My proposal for the White Bay Power Station (WBPS) is ‘CURE’- a holistic oncological treatment centre that includes cultural and research facilities. Whilst these spaces typically would not coexist, through vigorous planning and design, the WBPS can shift the hospital typology into a significant civic building, which becomes integral to the recovery process of patients, their support network, and the wider public.

During the course of interviews, a common issue raised by cancer patients was the lack of community engagement and entertainment availability during the oncology treatment process. Patients described this absence of meaningful and engaging outlets as contributing to a sense of isolation and dejectedness, which had overall poor outcomes for their emotional and mental wellbeing. This impact manifested itself negatively in the treatment process, for example, with patients missing appointments - and thus necessary treatment - due to their sense of futility and removal from the outside world. Supporting these empirical observations is the data from various studies, which has demonstrated a direct correlation between positive mental health and improved physical health in response to treatment.  

By combining a cultural centre with the cancer centre, CURE facilitates patients gaining access to engagement and entertainment programs whilst undergoing treatment, in addition to the provision of alternative therapies. Ideally, this combination will aid successful cancer treatment, by addressing the mental and emotional needs of patients of social interaction and activity, improving their overall wellbeing in conjunction with their oncological procedures. Adjoining the cancer centre at CURE are private housing facilities that will allow cancer patients and family members to remain on site during periods of intensive treatment. In addition to this, leading international medical professionals will be invited to stay on site while delivering seminars and contributing to the cancer research and treatment programs.

CURE was designed in a comprehensive manner where research, clinical treatment and entertainment co-exist harmoniously. The environment nurtures the innovation of doctors and scientists, allowing a much more rapid transition between clinical research and treatment process.

Developing the CURE: Reinvigorating the Treatment Process and Hospital Structure through Design

The earliest hospitals were remote communities whereby the ill were in state of quarantine from the wider population. 21st century hospitals have developed significantly since their refuge-oriented predecessors, and further as both disease and research advance, hospitals will need to enjoy an increasingly integral role within civil communities. Consequently, hospitals are no longer mere havens of the sick but rather all-encompassing facilities dedicated not only towards the physical medical treatment of patients, but also the provision of emotional, scientific and cultural support for patients and the broader community. CURE, through combining a cancer centre and cultural centre, facilitates this shift of purpose, whilst also improving mental well-being during treatment, a vital step in improving the holistic treatment of cancer.

I have designed CURE in alignment with research from the first phase of the project.  Evidence suggests aspects of the designed environment exert significant effects on clinical outcomes of patients (Rubin et al, 1998). Whilst most healthcare facilities neglect non-functional design aspects, the Ulrich report outlines the necessity for well-designed environments in reducing stress, anxiety, blood pressure, lessening pain and improving medical outcomes. I have focused on designing spaces within CURE that are bright, open and inviting, ensuring that natural materials and plants are visible throughout the entire centre. The three voids where machinery once sat have now been converted to light wells, that act as a spine to the entire building.  The light wells are vital as they provide natural light, which is proven to increase people’s productivity, mood and medical outcomes. On the other hand, the garden element provides a calming space, which fosters relaxation thereby reducing stress levels and pain, which improves the immune system, allowing patients’ bodies to heal more effectively. The 3D garden placed within these spaces, creates meeting space, passageways, lookout points and office spaces, allowing connectedness within the building between levels of research, treatment and housing. The design program has been formed with research on the lower levels, treatment on the middle level and housing on the top levels. This allows each space to be private enough for functional needs but also accessible as an interconnecting complex.

The innovation of CURE

CURE aims to deliver the much-needed hub for creative events that will be both permanent and adaptable with neighbouring hospitality facilities.  Providing both large-scale dramatic and intimate theatres and classroom-like spaces allows a variety of activities to take place within the cultural facilities and provides both tourism appeal and much needed services for the community. The integration of the cancer and cultural centres will also help promote cancer awareness, treatment typologies and prevention measures through complimentary onsite cancer screening tests. The cultural centre will also benefit patients who will be given unlimited access to performances and alternative therapies such as dance and humour therapy, encouraging patients to maintain treatment and boost their mental wellbeing, which in turn improves medical outcomes.

The introduction of rotational leading doctors through the onsite doctors-in-residence program allows for the ideas and thinking, which could potentially generate new research and innovation. Having a combined treatment and research centre allows physicians and researchers to work alongside each other, helping the research proceed swiftly into treatment.

CURE: A means of inspiration and survival

Cancer is a horrific illness that touches all members of the community in some way. By harnessing the multilevel and large space of WBPS, in the form of a coexisting cultural and treatment space, CURE aims to be a place, not only of treatment, but of survival and inspiration, for patients, medical professionals and the wider community.

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